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Fact Check: DeSantis on aid to Ukraine

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis argued against further US funding for Ukraine by saying that "tens of billions of dollars" have been used "to pay salaries for Ukrainian government bureaucrats," and that US taxpayers have "paid pensions for Ukrainian retirees." Facts First: This needs context. [...] The money, which is disbursed through the World Bank, has gone to pay "wages for hospital workers, government employees, and teachers as well as social assistance for the elderly and vulnerable." [...] It has also been provided to the Ukrainian government to "supply emergency services for internally displaced persons."
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Photo of Hawaiian park falsely shared as ‘Putin’s private villa’

A photo of a building complex inside a massive volcanic crater has been repeatedly shared in social media posts that falsely claim it shows a private villa owned by Russian President Vladimir Putin. In fact, the picture shows the Diamond Head Crater in Hawaii, a state park owned and maintained by the US government.
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How pro-Russian ‘yacht’ propaganda influenced US debate over Ukraine aid

A website founded by a former US Marine who now lives in Russia has fuelled a rumour that Volodymyr Zelensky purchased two luxury yachts with American aid money. Despite the false claim, the disinformation plot was successful. It took off online and was echoed by members of the US Congress making crucial decisions about military spending. It was an incredible assertion - using two advisers as proxies, Mr Zelensky paid $75m (£59m) for two yachts. But not only has the Ukrainian government flatly denied the story, the two ships in question have not even been sold.
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Tucker Carlson Misrepresents Defense Secretary’s Remarks on U.S. Troops, Ukraine Aid

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin III reportedly told House members that failure to provide more aid for Ukraine could lead to Russia's invasion of a NATO ally and a direct U.S. military response in accordance with the NATO treaty. A viral post by Tucker Carlson misleadingly omits Austin's explanation of why U.S. troops might be required.
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FactChecking the Fourth GOP Primary Debate

Christie derided Ramaswamy's plan for ending Russia's war in Ukraine, saying it would concede to Russia "all the land they've already stolen" and keep Ukraine from joining NATO (although Christie misspoke, saying the plan would keep Ukraine out of Russia). In exchange, Christie said, Ramaswamy would trust Russian President Vladimir Putin "not to have a relationship with China." Ramaswamy shot back, "That's not my deal." But it seems to be a mostly accurate synopsis of what Ramaswamy had proposed in June and refers to as the "reasonable peace deal."
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Fact check roundup: What’s true and what’s false about the Russian invasion of Ukraine

False and misleading information about the Russian invasion of Ukraine has spread rapidly on social media since Russian forces launched a military assault in the pre-dawn hours of Feb. 24. Here’s a roundup of claims related to the Ukraine-Russia conflict analyzed by the USA TODAY Fact Check team.
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Researchers: Disinformation campaign spread after wildfires slowed disaster response

A disinformation campaign that sprung up almost immediately after wildfires ravaged Maui was spread by China and Russia, researchers have concluded. And, they say, that campaign made the government’s response to the disaster even more difficult. From weather warfare to floating bodies on another island to thousands of missing children to a Maui land grab, experts say online posts about the wildfires might have started as genuine concern. But they also said China and Russia are now using artificial intelligence to amplify false messages and spread fear, division and distrust in government.
Read MoreResearchers: Disinformation campaign spread after wildfires slowed disaster response