Fact vs Fake tip #2: Is it the whole story?

Fact vs Fake tip # 1: Is it the whole story? Cross-reference information. Don’t rely on a single source. Check the facts against multiple other sources, especially those that have a different viewpoint. If a claim is true, multiple sources should verify it.
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Fact vs Fake tip #1: Check the source

Fact vs Fake tip #1: Check the source. Before you take any story at face value, check where it’s coming from. Is it a reputable outlet with a history of accurate reporting? Or is it a site you’ve never heard of, that is pushing sensational stories?
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No, Ukraine is not taking money from Hawai’i relief

In the wake of the devastating wildfires on Hawai’i in August 2023, viral posts falsely claimed that the US government would only provide $700 in aid each to affected households. In fact, the federal government responded quickly to the horrific disaster in Maui, conducting extensive rescue operations and providing aid far in excess of $700 per household.
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Bot networks. Online propaganda. “Troll farms”.

Hostile governments, and ideological factions spend millions to flood your news and social media with known untruths about what’s happening in Ukraine.

The good news: Today, it’s easier than ever to trace reports back to the source.


About us

Ukraine Fact Check is an independent project tracking viral claims about Ukraine. We trace reports back to the source, and give readers tools they can use to judge for themselves where the truth lies.
We believe in accuracy and transparency. Our goal is to empower members of the public to make informed decisions with the most complete information possible.

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Fact Checks


Latest fact checks – by our team

Deadly Kramatorsk missile was Russian – not Ukrainian

Deadly Kramatorsk missile was Russian – not Ukrainian

On June 28, 2023, a Russian missile hit a crowded restaurant in the Ukrainian city of Kramatorsk. 13 people died in this attack, including at least 3 children and a leading Ukrainian poet and author (as of July 3). As with pretty much every major strike on civilians, to add insult to injury, false stories immediately began being circulated by pro-Russian influencers online.
The word "Fake" appears in red letters on top of a screenshot of a social media post, which describes so-called baby factories supposedly discovered in Ukraine.

Fake news: No evidence of ‘baby factories’ in Ukraine

Sick: BBC’s fact-checking team have traced false claims of “baby factories” in Ukraine back to a notorious online hoax factory. “Who would possibly lie about something like that?” you might reasonably ask yourself. Depressingly, we have the answer to that question.

Latest fact checks – From across the internet

FACT CHECK: Kim Jong Un And Vladimir Putin Video Edited To Show The Two Refusing To Drink From Glasses After Toasting | Check Your Fact

FACT CHECK: Kim Jong Un And Vladimir Putin Video Edited To Show The Two Refusing To Drink From Glasses After Toasting | Check Your Fact

The caption reads, “When Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong UN met and none of them was willing to drink first.” The claim is inaccurate. The video has been edited to remove the moment that they drink. The full video shows that they did drink. The video shows the two toasted each other and then the other people at the table and then were clearly seen drinking.
Russia did not invade Ukraine to stop a NATO genocide in eastern regions

Russia did not invade Ukraine to stop a NATO genocide in eastern regions

The Verdict: False. There is no evidence that the people of eastern Ukraine were subject to systematic extermination. […] The claim was spread widely after [Russian Foreign Affairs official] Maria Zakharova […] stated in February 2022 that there was a “systematic extermination of the Donbas population.” However, an OSCE monitoring mission active in Ukraine since 2014 has found no evidence of mass targeted killings of civilians in the Donbas region. The Russian Foreign Ministry has not provided any proof to back up Zakharova’s claim.

Resources


Latest resources – From across the internet

Dig deeper with these advanced verification tools

Dig deeper with these advanced verification tools

If you’ve been brushing up on the FRANCE 24 Observers’ verification guide, then you now have the know-how to verify images with a reverse image search or check for edits with some forensic tools. You should also have the basic instincts needed to be wary when scrolling through social media. This guide will show you some more advanced verification techniques that can help you dig a bit deeper into the origins of a post or a page.
How to verify a photo online and fight the spread of misinformation

How to verify a photo online and fight the spread of misinformation

You just received a photo on WhatsApp, Facebook or Twitter. The image makes you angry, sad or joyful, and the caption encourages you to share it as widely as possible. You’re a little cautious, however, because the story seems too good to be true. You are right to be careful. Here are a few tips for verifying images and tracing a photo’s origin on your own.

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